Metabolic Exchange and Energetic Coupling between Nutritionally Stressed Bacterial Species: Role of Quorum-Sensing Molecules

Formation of multispecies communities allows nearly every niche on earth to be colonized, and the exchange of molecular information among neighboring bacteria in such communities is key for bacterial success. To clarify the principles controlling interspecies interactions, we previously developed a coculture model with two anaerobic bacteria, Clostridium acetobutylicum (Gram positive) and Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough (Gram negative, sulfate reducing). Under conditions of nutritional stress for D. vulgaris, the existence of tight cell-cell interactions between the two bacteria induced emergent properties. Here, we show that the direct exchange of carbon metabolites produced by C. acetobutylicum allows D vulgaris to duplicate its DNA and to be energetically viable even without its substrates. We identify the molecular basis of the physical interactions and how autoinducer-2 (AI-2) molecules control the interactions and metabolite exchanges between C. acetobutylicum and D. vulgaris (or Escherichia coli and D. vulgaris). With nutrients, D. vulgaris produces a small molecule that inhibits in vitro the AI-2 activity and could act as an antagonist in vivo. Sensing of AI-2 by D. vulgaris could induce formation of an intercellular structure that allows directly or indirectly metabolic exchange and energetic coupling between the two bacteria.

David Ranava, Cassandra Backes, Ganesan Karthikeyan, Olivier Ouari, Audrey Soric, et al.. Metabolic Exchange and Energetic Coupling between Nutritionally Stressed Bacterial Species: Role of Quorum-Sensing Molecules. mBio, American Society for Microbiology, 2021, 12 (1), pp.e02758-20. ⟨10.1128/mBio.02758-20⟩. ⟨hal-03115469⟩

Journal: mBio

Date de publication: 01-01-2021

Auteurs:

Digital object identifier (doi): http://dx.doi.org/10.1128/mBio.02758-20


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